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20120925
20121003
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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
." this is a very old statute enacted by the first congress. it has sat dormant for 170 years. in some civil right type folks picked it up. -- been some civil right type folks picked it up and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign. the defendant is foreign. the tour took place in some foreign place. they say you have jurisdiction over this. courts have been going for this. they have been allowing some of these cases to go forward. this case raised the question of the of -- in this particular case, it took place in nigeria. the guy says the nigerian government committed these against me. they mistreated me. these foreign will company's work implicit -- foreign companies were implicit. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. the defendant say this is not apply to corporations. he cannot actually sue a corporation under the statute. that was their claim. they did something very unusual. they actually said we want to consider a broader question. we would like you to brief not just this question of does it apply to corporations, but also doesn't apply extraterritor
know, he gets a lot of grief on civil rights. and it's true he did not use the bully pulpit. he could have done a better job on that. but he was a subtle guy. he desegregated d.c. when people weren't watching. he desegrated the armed wt tr. appointed all the federal judges that desegregated the south. he believed in moving, as john was saying, with a hidden hand. that's true on civil rights as well. he's been unfairly criticized for being weak on civil rights. he was not as strong as he could havebeen, but he did ts poant. w >> let's talk, presidential historian, jon meacham, who has a book coming out after the election that's forthcoming. "thomas jefferson, t.j." ike, a good president? a ar great president? or a great president? think that he -- one of the things we haven't talked about on the domestic side is he ratified what franklin roosevelt and harry truman had done in that he could have created --n 1952, 3,it cle,think, and check me on this, evan, was such that if he had been really intent on rolling back the new deal and the fair deal, it would ve been a huge fight and would h
enacted by the first congress. but it sat dormant for 170 odd years. then some civil rights type folks picked it up and human rights type folks and started bringing cases in which the plaintiff is foreign, the defendant is foreign, and the tort took place in some foreign place and they are bringing it to u.s. courts. so a paraguayan plaintiff and a pair of wayne defendant and it took place in her way. so the ticket to a u.s. -- a paraguayan plaintiff and a paraguayan defendant and it took place in paraguay. so they take it to the u.s. in this particular case, k iobal takes place in nigeria. and the nigerian government mistreated me, torture and so forth and these will companies, foreign oil companies, were complice it, helping the nigerian government do this to me. so i am wanting to sue the oil companies in federal court. and the oil companies defendants say that this does not apply to corporations. you cannot sue a corporation under this statute. that was their claim last year at the supreme court and the u.s. supreme court heard arguments in the case and did something very unusual.
a new constitution. with that constitution, we further secured the human rights and civil liberties of our citizens and entrenched constitutional governance and justice. over each of the past 0 years we have scored significant victries over diseases including h.i.v. and aids. malaria. tuberculosis and other childhood and adult diseases. hundreds of thousands of more children have found their way into school and in life, life skills through training and capacity building. we have also taken many kenyans and put them on the pathaway of economic independence and self-reliance. in doing this, we have also expanded our economic base. opening up new andive infrastructure, energy, and information technology projects. the achievements in our country have been attained through the respect for the rule of law. through sound policies, improved governance, as well as open and innovative democracy. however, as all kenyans recognize, we will have a lot more work to do. poverty, disease, unemployment still remain a big challenge for us. nevertheless, i am confident that we will see the opportunity
respect the right in a situation of civil war? >> is not just accepting the right, it is the position of the international world. it is not achievable in every country right now. there are lots of countries where you don't have those kinds of rights were we have solid relations with china. and so is an aspiration and it is an aspiration that increasingly, over time, has become a reality in some many parts of the world. and so we keep pushing that aspiration ford and keep hoping that country after country, one group of people after another will learn to live in peace and build a representative form of government. when you say democracy, you think american jeffersonian model. there are lots of models. but is the aspiration that everyone has the right to self- determination. i hope it will happen in syria as well. we don't know how to make it happen, but remember that we live with all the countries in the arab spring for years without those rights being there. we found it necessary to accommodate ourselves to the fact that these were autocratic leaders and it was their people that finall
involve actual involvement on the ground. i don't know the attitude that either. so right now i think we are kind of, we are kind of in a difficult position where it's horrible to see these things unfold every day on television, but it is a civil war. and you hope you can find a point of fatigue reached on the part of both sides so the and then try to find a kind of peaceful resolution. it's not very peaceful after what you've seen what's been done in the cities with all the loss of life. but i think neither side is close to that point of fatigue, and i do not see anyone really coming to a solution involving the use of military force to break the elections apart, or to oppose a settlement on the situation. so it's going to continue to be ugly for a long period of time. can't tell you how long. it might be two weeks. it might be to use. remember what his father was prepared to do back in the early '80s, killing 80,000 people, and not giving up alawite control of that country. and that's what assad is facing. not just his personal destiny and his family, but his whole people. >> okay, than
in the history of the modern church because it has set up a 1i68 court. it's a civil court which is also opened up to the public. >> father gall when the butler was arrested, he told investigators that this could be a healthy thing to bring the church back on the right track. was he in any sense right? >> it seems that the butler was trying in some way to help the pope. in fact, the information that was revealed through the documents that the butler stole is in no way incriminating of the pope himself. in fact, the pope comes off as very kind and gentle throughout all those documents. it doesn't make sense what the butler is claiming. that's one of the things they want, to ascertain the fullness of the truth which is what the pope wants. >> we're expecting a pardon from the pope ultimately. why? >> perhaps. the pope hasn't given any indication he will pardon him. he has indicated his great affection for paulo gab iele. the entire family lives in the vatican and are citizens of the vatican city state. nonetheless, i'm sure the pope wants to first determine that he has fully revealed the truth as
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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